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Author Topic: Gout Uric Acid and Gout Treatments  (Read 40 times)

tyronmayo

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Gout Uric Acid and Gout Treatments
« on: August 23, 2016, 10:26:09 am »
Gout Uric Acid - Gout Treatments
Common cause of gout is the accumulation of a chemical called uric acid. Uric acid is a normal breakdown product of another chemical called purines. The treatment involves controlling the inflammation, which causes the pain and swelling and ultimately damage to joints. Also, lowering the uric acid level is a logical means to controlling gout.

  • Most of the time the symptom can be controlled by anti-inflammatory medications like naproxen or indomethacin.
  • In severe cases steroids like prednisone may be needed.
  • Some people even need injections into the joints.
  • Fluid from the swollen joints can be removed and analyzed for the uric acid crystals.
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There is some benefit to avoiding foods that cause gout but most people who get gout will need medication to prevent joint damage and also prevent future attacks which often happen sooner and are more severe. They can also cause permanent damage to the kidney and joints. The crystals can also deposit on the skin and are then called tophi.

The specific dose and the manner of taking these medicines are best discussed with your healthcare provider.   Common side effects of these drugs include stomach upset and ulcers from prednisone and ibuprofen type of medications, diarrhea from colchicine and sometimes gout can get worse from allopurinol especially if the person is not on colchicine first during an acute attack.

The treatment includes medicines like allopurinol, which decrease the level of uric acid, or there are other medicines like colchicine, which decrease inflammation. Also there are medicines called uricosuric agents that increase the removal of uric acid in urine. Colchicine works best if taken really early in the attack and sometimes repeat does may need to be taken periodically such as every two hours or so till there is pain relief or a maximum dose is reached or there are side effects like gastrointestinal upset.

Recently, a Gout and Diet Prevention Study Was Published in by Dr
Hyon K. Choi and Gary Curhan in Arthritis Care & Research's June 2007 issue which examined the fact that, contrary to popular belief, coffee may not be as bad for gout sufferers as previously thought. Although gout patients have been told to stay away from coffee, there may be an ingredient in the beverage that can actually help to lower the uric acid levels in the body. :D.

Considering that until this study, gout sufferers had been discouraged from drinking coffee, many gout sufferers may now be wondering what other gout and diet prevention beliefs may soon turn out to be disproved. For example, though tea has not been found to reduce uric acid levels in the body as has now been demonstrated with coffee, tea is often thought to be unacceptable as a part of a gout and diet prevention strategy. Instead, tea can indeed be a part of a gout diet as long as it is consumed in moderation and as long as its dehydrating effect is compensated for by taking in additional water.

Similar Belief Was Once Applied to Alcohol
It was thought that spirits, wine, and beer were the true cause of gout. Indeed, drinking to excess can be harmful to gout sufferers, especially due to the resulting dehydration of the body. Hydration is especially important to gout sufferers as it allows the body to flush the uric acid out of the blood, preventing its buildup as crystals on the joints. However, drinking alcohol is not a direct cause of gout.

Though it is not yet known what part of coffee is responsible for lowering the uric acid levels in the body, it is known that it is not just the caffeine content, as the same results were not found from drinking caffeinated tea. Whatever the cause, when participants drank one to two cups of coffee every day, the levels of uric acid in the blood reduced dramatically. Furthermore, as coffee consumption increased, uric acid levels decreased.

Was Also Believed At One Time that Eating Rich Foods Was the Root Cause of Gout
Indeed, some rich foods are high in proteins and purines and therefore may contribute to gout flare-ups, however low fat dairy products have now been shown to have a preventative effect. Also Gout is believed to be caused by many factors, including being heredity.

  • Similar study in Japan looked into the same concept, but used decaffeinated coffee.
  • Similar, though not equal, results were witnessed.
  • This is why it is now thought that components of coffee other than soley caffeine are responsible for lowering the uric acid levels in the body.
Gout is a Medical Condition Which Poses a Serious Threat to Your Health
Gout is known to have an impact that will last a very long time. These effects of the gout can also continue between the gout attacks as well.  Joint damage is one of the most common effect of the gout. Other gout complications that may have serious long term effect on your body are: nerve damage in the ares of the gout attacks, kidney stones and even problems with the function of your kidney.

  • The deposit of uric crystals is one of the complications that you can have when suffering from gout.
  • These tophi get formed in the joints of your hands and feet.
  • This gout complication usually causes deformities, damage the tissue that surrounds the area of the gout.
  • As a result you might suffer from destruction of your joint, constant pain and more worse, compression of your nerves.
  • This is just one of the many gout effects.
  • It takes about ten years for a gout patient to develop a chronic gout stage.
  • At this stage, the gout has already cause serious damage to your joints.
  • Of course, we are talking about the joints that have been affected by the gout.
  • Furthermore, at this stage, some damage to your kidneys may have also been cause by the gout.
  • More than half of the gout patients that have reached this stage also suffer from tophi, which are crystals of uric acid.
  • Studies show that a number of three gout patient out of four suffer from tophi by the time they have reached the twentieth year of their gout.
  • However, having some joints problems may happen sooner than expected in many gout patients.
  • Diet is thought by many gout patients to be the reason why they developed this medical condition in the first place.
  • Some foods and the use of alcohol is what many blame for a gout and it' s long term complications.
  • However, your gout can only be controlled by lowering the uric acid found in your blood.
  • Moreover, the levels of this acid are the ones to blame for a gout attack in the first place.
  • These levels can also indicate with some doubt, if you might suffer from another gout attack or not.
  • However, the best thing for you is to talk to your doctor about your gout.
  • It might also be wise for you to change some things in your diet, if you and your doctor believe that will change your gout status. life is short.
  • Use it to its maximum by utilizing whatever knowledge it offers for knowledge is important for all walks of life.
  • Even the crooks have to be intelligent!
Gout is a painful disease of the joints, which usually affects the big toe first in most people. It is caused by too much uric acid in the blood. Uric acid is formed by the breakdown of chemicals called purines, which can lead to high levels of uric acid and cause many problems such as joint swelling and kidney stones. Normally the uric acid is dissolved in the blood and passes out via the kidneys into the urine but if this does not occur it can build up in the body and cause the crystals to deposit and cause gout.

  • Low carbohydrate diets, especially when very protein rich and with inadequate water intake can also cause gout.
  • A family history of gout may also predispose a person towards getting it. :)
Some Genetic Diseases Affect the Breakdown of Uric Acid and Also Cause It to Build Up
Other causes include exposure to lead, foods high animal protein, some medications, obesity, excess alcohol or foods rich in purines. Some foods that cause gout are organ meats such as liver, brain and kidneys. Other foods include herring, anchovies, peas and dried beans. Alcohol affects the elimination of uric acid especially when taken in excess.

Medications such as diuretics (which help the kidney eliminate more urine) or aspirin cause gout. And people who have had an organ transplant are prone to gout. Patients on numerous medicines should talk to their healthcare provider to see if there are interactions between medicine and if an alternate drug may help. The common vitamin niacin can also trigger gout.

  • Foods that cause gout are rich in a chemical called purines.
  • These foods include organ meats such as liver, brain, kidneys and sweetbreads.
  • Other foods include anchovies, herring, dried peas and beans. :D
The purines get converted to uric acid but if they accumulate in excess they will cause gout. The uric acid crystals, which form will irritate the lining of joints such as the one in the big toe. This leads to inflammation and pain and swelling at the joint. Cutting back on the amount of foods that cause gout or avoiding them is a good idea if someone has gout, however, always remember to get an adequate and balanced diet. Alcohol affects the removal of uric acid from the body and too much alcohol can trigger gout. Low carbohydrate diets, which are rich in protein, can also trigger gout. People often forget to drink enough water especially in winter and this needs to be kept in mind if they are on a low carbohydrate diet. With the use of medications there is less of a need for a drastic dietary change but avoiding or limiting certain foods will help reduce the severity of attacks and may help people who have difficulty with medications that treat gout.

  • There is some recent research, which has shown that vitamin C in certain doses may decrease the uric acid level slightly.
  • However it may not be relevant in patients with gout and further details are needed.
  • Another interesting recent research revelation was that meat and seafood intake raised uric acid levels but dairy intake decreased it.
  • Again, what this means for patients who have gout or individuals trying to prevent gout is unclear.
  • Surprisingly, recent analyses have shown that moderate protein or even purine-rich vegetables was not associated with an increased risk of gout.

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